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Spine Surgery, Spinal Disc Herniation (Stock Footage)

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Duksi
Author Level 5 from VideoHive

Technical specifications

Mixed on different site specifications
Operating Systems
&
Type
Stock Video
Category
Looped Video
No
Video Encoding
H.264
Total Clip(s) Length
00:00:11
Number of Clips
1
Alpha Channel
No
Frame Rate
25
Source Audio
No
Resolution
3840x2160
Created
30 January 20
Last Update
30 January 20
File Size
25.54Mb

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Description

From VideoHive

A Spinal disc herniation (prolapsus disci intervertebralis) is a medical condition affecting the spine due to trauma, lifting injuries, or idiopathic (unknown) causes, in which a tear in the outer, fibrous ring (annulus fibrosus) of an intervertebral disc (discus intervertebralis) allows the soft, central portion (nucleus pulposus) to bulge out beyond the damaged outer rings. Tears are almost always postero-lateral in nature owing to the presence of the posterior longitudinal ligament in the spinal canal.[1] This tear in the disc ring may result in the release of inflammatory chemical mediators which may directly cause severe pain, even in the absence of nerve root compression.

Disc herniations are normally a further development of a previously existing disc “protrusion”, a condition in which the outermost layers of the annulus fibrosus are still intact, but can bulge when the disc is under pressure. In contrast to a herniation, none of the nucleus pulposus escapes beyond the outer layers.

Most minor herniations heal within several weeks. Anti-inflammatory treatments for pain associated with disc herniation, protrusion, bulge, or disc tear are generally effective. Severe herniations may not heal of their own accord and may require surgical intervention.

The condition is widely referred to as a slipped disc, but this term is not medically accurate as the spinal discs are fixed in position between the vertebrae and cannot “slip”.

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